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April 7, 2014 at 9:24 PM

(Source: the-longboard-living, via turtlesand)

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April 7, 2014 at 9:18 PM

Cadets read Howl, February l9, l99l, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia.
Gordon Ball

Cadets read Howl, February l9, l99l, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia.

Gordon Ball

(Source: superbestiario, via superbestiario)

April 7, 2014 at 9:17 PM

America when will we end the human war? 

Go fuck yourself with your atom bomb 
I don’t feel good don’t bother me.

from  America by Allen Ginsberg

(Source: pariism)

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March 24, 2014 at 11:38 AM

"Psychedelic Moon Tree"
Artist: Kara Rane

"Psychedelic Moon Tree"

Artist: Kara Rane

(via universeobserver)

Photoset

March 24, 2014 at 11:35 AM

"In a great hall with pillars hewn out of the living stone sat the Elvenking on a chair of carven wood. On his head was a crown of berries and red leaves, for the autumn was come again. In the spring he wore a crown of woodland flowers. In his hand he held a carven staff of oak."

(Source: misselizabethbennets, via psychofloyd)

Link

March 24, 2014 at 11:25 AM

Grammar's great divide: The Oxford comma. →

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March 24, 2014 at 11:23 AM

the-library-and-step-on-it:

The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole.Book Review by the-library-and-step-on-it.

Often credited as the first Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto has all the ingredients you’d expect: mistaken identities, ghosts, incest, women running through dark hallways in a billowing nightgown… And it is (unintentionally?) hilarious. In the opening paragraphs, the prince of Otranto is dashed to pieces when a gigantic helmet falls from the sky and crushes him to death. …Of course!Sadly, the hilarity wears off after a while and you’re left with a book that may have spawned an entire genre, but doesn’t have much more to offer than that. Walpole said that he used Shakespeare as his model for this and it shows (there are traces of Macbeth and Hamlet all over the text), but Otranto is nowhere near as complex, emotional, or well-written. Walpole all but shoves his symbols in your face and then underlines them three more times with a bright red pen for good measure. If you’re interested in the humble beginnings of the gothic novel, this is a must-read and, at 119 pages, a quick one at that. You can play Bingo with all the familiar genre tropes and giggle at the absurdity of certain plot twists. If this doesn’t like a fun night in to you, feel free to skip it.(I will give Walpole some credit: he initially managed to fool people into thinking that this was a translation of a recently resurfaced ancient manuscript. He even wrote an introduction, pretending to be Otranto's translator and praising his own work for its excellent writing. Great stuff.)
Find more reviews here.

the-library-and-step-on-it:

The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole.
Book Review by the-library-and-step-on-it.

Often credited as the first Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto has all the ingredients you’d expect: mistaken identities, ghosts, incest, women running through dark hallways in a billowing nightgown… And it is (unintentionally?) hilarious. In the opening paragraphs, the prince of Otranto is dashed to pieces when a gigantic helmet falls from the sky and crushes him to death. …Of course!

Sadly, the hilarity wears off after a while and you’re left with a book that may have spawned an entire genre, but doesn’t have much more to offer than that. Walpole said that he used Shakespeare as his model for this and it shows (there are traces of Macbeth and Hamlet all over the text), but Otranto is nowhere near as complex, emotional, or well-written. Walpole all but shoves his symbols in your face and then underlines them three more times with a bright red pen for good measure.

If you’re interested in the humble beginnings of the gothic novel, this is a must-read and, at 119 pages, a quick one at that. You can play Bingo with all the familiar genre tropes and giggle at the absurdity of certain plot twists. If this doesn’t like a fun night in to you, feel free to skip it.

(I will give Walpole some credit: he initially managed to fool people into thinking that this was a translation of a recently resurfaced ancient manuscript. He even wrote an introduction, pretending to be Otranto's translator and praising his own work for its excellent writing. Great stuff.)

Find more reviews here.

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March 24, 2014 at 11:21 AM

 

 

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March 24, 2014 at 11:20 AM

(Source: joetheblogger, via kushandcake)

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March 3, 2014 at 7:24 PM

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March 2, 2014 at 9:40 PM

(Source: prescriptionjars)

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March 2, 2014 at 9:36 PM

(Source: thehorologicon)

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March 2, 2014 at 9:32 PM

(Source: cannablogging, via psychedelic-revolver)

March 2, 2014 at 9:31 PM

 

(Source: thepinkfloydstory, via psychedelic-revolver)

Artist: Roger Waters

Title: Money (Demo)

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March 2, 2014 at 9:29 PM